Forum catholique LE PEUPLE DE LA PAIX

Smart Cities projet,  en anglais, mais alarmant  Bannie10

Bienvenue sur le Forum catholique Le Peuple de la Paix!
Les sujets de ce forum sont: La Foi, la vie spirituelle, la théologie, la prière, les pèlerinages, la Fin des temps, le Nouvel ordre mondial, la puce électronique (implants sur l`homme), les sociétés secrètes, et bien d'autres thèmes...

Pour pouvoir écrire sur le forum, vous devez:
1- Être un membre enregistré
2- Posséder le droit d`écriture

Pour vous connecter ou vous enregistrer, cliquez sur «Connexion» ou «S`enregistrer» ci-dessous.

Pour obtenir le droit d`écriture, présentez-vous en cliquant sur un des liens "droit d`écriture" apparaissant sur le portail, sur l'index du forum ou encore sur la barre de navigation visible au haut du forum. Notre mail : moderateurlepeupledelapaix@yahoo.com

Rejoignez le forum, c’est rapide et facile

Forum catholique LE PEUPLE DE LA PAIX

Smart Cities projet,  en anglais, mais alarmant  Bannie10

Bienvenue sur le Forum catholique Le Peuple de la Paix!
Les sujets de ce forum sont: La Foi, la vie spirituelle, la théologie, la prière, les pèlerinages, la Fin des temps, le Nouvel ordre mondial, la puce électronique (implants sur l`homme), les sociétés secrètes, et bien d'autres thèmes...

Pour pouvoir écrire sur le forum, vous devez:
1- Être un membre enregistré
2- Posséder le droit d`écriture

Pour vous connecter ou vous enregistrer, cliquez sur «Connexion» ou «S`enregistrer» ci-dessous.

Pour obtenir le droit d`écriture, présentez-vous en cliquant sur un des liens "droit d`écriture" apparaissant sur le portail, sur l'index du forum ou encore sur la barre de navigation visible au haut du forum. Notre mail : moderateurlepeupledelapaix@yahoo.com
Forum catholique LE PEUPLE DE LA PAIX
Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
Le Deal du moment : -24%
Note d’Espresso – Oro di Napoli Lot 48 ...
Voir le deal
6.62 €

Smart Cities projet, en anglais, mais alarmant

Aller en bas

Smart Cities projet,  en anglais, mais alarmant  Empty Smart Cities projet, en anglais, mais alarmant

Message par PiotrM Ven 27 Nov 2020 - 12:47

[size=35]Too Smart[/size]
How Digital Capitalism is Extracting Data, Controlling Our Lives, and Taking Over the World
MIT Press, 2020 



Recommendation
Jathan Sadowski’s searing, alarming exposé reveals how smart technology will soon achieve domination of human life. Technocratic organizations use smart devices to extract data from people’s bodies, homes and interactions with police and government agencies. Everything you do becomes a source of value they aggregate, analyze and sell to insurance companies, retailers and surveillance enterprises. Governments and corporations use data to control you using covert and overt behavior-modification methods. Sadowski issues an urgent call to action to collectivize data and resist corporate encroachment.
Take-Aways
·        “Smart tech” is a pervasive and powerful presence in human lives.
·        Data are a form of capital; those with the most data possess the most power.
·        Digital capitalism reduces people to “data streams.”
·        Social credit systems and micromanaging workers via smart tech are behavior-modification tools.
·        The smart city is an “urban war machine” in which mass surveillance criminalizes daily life.
·        To serve the public good, data should be transparent and accountable.
Summary
“Smart tech” is a pervasive and powerful presence in human lives.
Smart tech is any device with the capacity for “data collection, network connectivity, and enhanced control.” Soon, smart tech won’t be optional when you buy, for example, an electric toothbrush; it will be a standard feature. You won’t be able to opt out of someone tracking your movements, behavior and preferences.
For every person who benefits from technology, others suffer. Technology is naturally political, in that certain people will have the power to make decisions about how other people live and work. The technocrats that hold power are part of an oligarchy. When citizens don’t participate in the decisions that govern their lives, they effectively become subject to a de facto authoritarian state.
“The imperative of control is about creating systems that monitor, manage, and manipulate the world and people.”
In this coming era of “digital capitalism,” technopolitics will present itself in three ways:
1.      “Interests” – Smart tech expands and advances corporate interests, prioritizing them over “human autonomy, social goods, and democratic rights.”
2.     “Imperatives” – Digital capitalism seeks to both extract data from and exert control over everything and every person.
3.     “Impacts” – In exchange for convenience and connection, people must endure changes to their lives and privacy they cannot predict.
There is no conspiracy to cause harm to society or its constituents. Instead, the system favors privileged interests. To navigate capitalism’s principles of “exclusion, extraction and exploitation,” society must critically assess digital capitalism’s dangers and threats.
Data are a form of capital; those with the most data possess the most power.
Amazon transformed retail, disrupting other giants such as Walmart and recently purchasing Whole Foods. Amazon Web Services is a true control center in the cloud, and will expand Amazon’s reach into daily life. Corporations and governments use it for computation and to store data. Whole Foods, for example, will track how people purchase items in its stores, turning brick-and-mortar edifices into “physical websites.” In exchange for constant surveillance and forfeiting your privacy, Amazon will make shopping more convenient with autobilling. This is an example of smart tech “terraforming,” or shaping, society to serve digital capitalism’s aims.
“Like other political projects, building the smart society is a battle for our imagination.”
Data are a form of capital – no different than money or goods – with wide applications. Data can be used to:
·        “Profile and target people” – Companies gain profits from knowing more about you, for example, via personalized ads.
·        “Optimize systems” – To make savings, data are used to increase efficiency and reduce waste.
·        “Manage things” – Knowledge from data, such as statistics on a health app to monitor a person’s weight, or traffic flow in cities, is used to enhance systems.
·        “Model probabilities” – Data can help make predictions, for example, determining criminal “hot spots” in a neighborhood.
·        “Build stuff” – AI and machine learning aid the creation of platforms dependent upon data. Without data, the taxi firm Uber wouldn’t exist.
·        “Grow the value of assets” – Smart data can slow the decline of assets such as machines or cars.
Technocrats want to build a world of data, and convert anyone, anywhere – and any process – into profit. But data aren’t just “there” to be found. “Data mining” is a misleading term, as is the assertion that data are “the new oil.” Both wrongly imply that data exist to be extracted. They don’t reflect the fact that technocratic entities manufacture data for certain aims, and by ​​​​not compensating people for that data, they exploit and steal from them.
Digital capitalism reduces people to “data streams.” 
In society, there are three types of power: “sovereign, disciplinary and control.” For centuries, sovereign power used force to extract compliance. Later, institutions such as schools or the workplace instilled disciplinary power through norms and beliefs. Digital capitalism, via smart tech on apps, phones or over Wi-Fi, is a control regime that sets parameters and monitors behavior constantly, in real time.
“Smart tech enhances the ability to take one attribute, action, or category, and make it representative of the whole person.”
Digital capitalism exerts power by turning an individual into what French philosopher Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) calls a “dividual.” Rather than interact with an entire person, the system interacts with his or her discrete parts. When sensors collect your temperature or count your steps and send that data for aggregation, that creates a profile based on your behaviors or actions. Data brokers sell that information to companies and governments. These data better target consumers and aid police departments, employers and government agencies in assessing, for example, who is likely to commit a crime or who is at risk for defaulting on a loan.
These data streams have a large and growing impact on insurance. In the United States, health insurance ties to employment, and in promoting “wellness,” employers increasingly track employee health with wearable tech, which sends data for analysis and impacts employee benefits. Other home health tech covertly extracts data to monitor and punish users who use it improperly.
“At last, insurers can replace the old proverb ‘trust but verify’ with ‘comply or else’.”
Car insurance companies track driving habits and adjust your premiums accordingly. Insurance may replace advertising as a bankroller for smart tech as its reach and influence expands. By assigning premiums to people’s daily activities, insurers engage in behavior modification. Such power outstrips government control over people’s lives; profits drive it all.
Social credit systems and micromanaging workers via smart tech are behavior-modification tools.
China is an example of a country that deploys data streams for total control. Zhima Credit (Sesame Credit) partnered with Alibaba, China’s largest social media platform, to turn its massive data stream into an integrated Social Credit System. A person’s three-digit score reflects their worth, reputation and status. Zhima uses data collected from various professional and personal sources. High scores bring benefits; low scores relegate people to the “digital underclass.” China intends to roll out its integrated Social Credit System in 2020, with its guiding message: “If trust is broken in one place, restrictions are imposed everywhere.”
“It is the strangely conspiratorial truth of the surveillance society we inhabit that there are unknown entities gathering our data for unknown purposes.”
Among the lower-paid, unskilled labor force in the United States, invasive tracking increases. Amazon, for example, monitors its workers’ every move in its fulfillment centers. Examples in other companies include software to track keystrokes by remote workers, and putting chips inside employees that open doors and operate vending machines for them. Capitalism has long monetized labor at the expense of worker wellbeing. Now, it exploits people in new, invasive ways.
People allow smart tech into their lives and homes because of an ideology born in Silicon Valley: that every problem has a technological solution. This technocratic “solutionism” overlooks human values in favour of technical ones.
The smart city is an “urban war machine” in which mass surveillance criminalizes daily life.
Some think the “smart city” will be a “technoutopia,” where people can live frictionless lives surrounded by state-of-the-art amenities as data collection agencies track their movements and habits to improve services. However, experimental smart cities in South Korea and the United Arab Emirates have attracted few residents. The reality of smart cities is not in those places but all around us, in our smart homes, smart TVs, fridges and vacuum cleaners. It is subtle and unnoticeable. Smart tech seizes the collective imagination and sells a future full of innovation and disruption. But with the promise of more convenience comes the imposition of parameters and boundaries on behavior.
“Silicon Valley has until now tried to control the world in various ways; the point is to liberate it.”
Smart city solutions include using tech to predict and punish crime with society’s most vulnerable as test subjects. For example, Silicon Valley-based Palantir provides surveillance tools to the police. Its tech is proprietary; the services it provides to cities lack transparency or accountability to the citizens it tracks. Other smart tech tracks cellphone use, and assigns threat intensity to certain neighborhoods, predicting where and when crime will happen.
Unlike the smart cities in marketing leaflets, the real version is invisible and pervasive, an “urban war machine” that secretly monitors people’s actions. Police collect data on people who haven’t yet committed crimes and combine it with data from private and public institutions to create searchable databases called “fusion centers,” with IBM and Microsoft’s aid. All data are now police data.
People sacrifice civil liberties for security. Police will target neighborhoods with high crime, leading to more arrests, and marginalizing the neighborhood further as prediction becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. This infringes on citizen privacy, violates civil rights and can lead to wrongful prosecution, systemic bias and other human rights violations. The result is a serious erosion of trust.
To serve the public good, data should be transparent and accountable.
Smart tech developed to extract data from people to control them, but alternatives exist. Collective action to change digital capitalism and make a better society can happen in three transformative ways:
1.      “Unmake” systems that exploit and control – Workers should stage “microresistances,” such as gaming the systems and the tech that defines their days. They can thus assert agency and undermine capitalist control mechanisms.
2.     Democratize innovation – Power and control mustn’t belong to the “meritocracy” – wealthy, white men. Treating smart tech users as citizens, not consumers, and getting their feedback and input, can effect change. People should demand transparency and accountability from those who create intelligent systems. 
3.     Make smart tech a public good – Insist governments fund “socially useful production” and choose public stakeholders over private shareholders. 
“When faced with the decision between adapting to a smarter society or un/making a dumber world, choose the latter.”
Data animate digital capitalism, leading tech giants to hoard it and hold society captive, toxifying democracy. A progressive strategy to change data governance involves two steps: “demanding oversight”and “demanding ownership.” Oversight requires reforms in regulations. Anti-trust laws would challenge techno-oligarchs.
Giving people ownership over their data forestalls tech giants from profiting from it and would contribute to a better society. Collectivizing data as a shared resource would help identify the vulnerable and improve social welfare systems. Data would no longer be a currency traded on the market among the super-rich, but a public utility, like electricity. A “data repository” would protect the public and reward companies that request access to it for society’s betterment. Data’s benefits should be equally distributed to unlock their full potential.
About the Author
Jathan Sadowski is a research fellow in the Emerging Technologies Research Lab at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He writes on the politics of technology for publications including The GuardianOneZero, and Real Life.

PiotrM
Avec Saint Maximilien Kolbe

Masculin Messages : 99
Localisation : Pologne
Inscription : 27/10/2019

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Smart Cities projet,  en anglais, mais alarmant  Empty Re: Smart Cities projet, en anglais, mais alarmant

Message par azais Sam 28 Nov 2020 - 0:25

ça meriterait un resume en francais non ?

azais
MEDIATEUR
MEDIATEUR

Masculin Messages : 7913
Age : 70
Inscription : 10/02/2016

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Smart Cities projet,  en anglais, mais alarmant  Empty Re: Smart Cities projet, en anglais, mais alarmant

Message par PiotrM Dim 29 Nov 2020 - 22:27

OK. Je essaierai de le faire  autant que j'aurai du temps . Au moins les points principaux.

Comme une préface  - vielle blague. Les informaticiens (comme moi)  savent  c'est  pas loin la réalité dans laquelle on vit, c’est-à-dire, le Google nous espionne. 

 NOTRE AMI GOOGLE

Allo, Giovanni Pizza ?
- Non Monsieur, c'est Google Pizza.
- Ah je me suis trompé de numéro ?
- Non Monsieur, Google a racheté la pizzeria.
- Ok, prenez ma commande donc
- Bien Monsieur, vous prenez comme d'habitude ?
- Comme d'habitude ? Mais vous me connaissez ?
- Compte tenu de votre numéro de téléphone qui s'affiche ici, vous avez commandé ces 12 dernières fois une pizza 3 fromages avec supplément chorizo.
- Ok, c'est exact....
- Puis je vous suggérer de prendre cette fois la pizza avec fenouil, tomate et une salade ?
- Non vraiment, j'ai horreur des légumes. 
- Mais votre cholestérol n'est pas brillant...
- Comment vous le savez ?!
- Par vos emails et historique Chrome, nous avons vos résultats de test sanguins de ces 7 dernières années.
- Ok...mais je ne veux pas de cette pizza, je prends des médicaments pour traiter mon cholestérol. 
- Vous ne prenez pas votre traitement suffisamment régulièrement, l'achat de la dernière boîte de 30 comprimés habituels date d'il y a 4 mois à la pharmacie Robert au 2 rue Saint Martin. 
- J'en ai acheté d'autres depuis dans une autre pharmacie.
- Cela n'est pas indiqué sur votre relevé de carte bancaire.
- J'ai payé en espèces !
- Mais cela n'est pas indiqué sur votre relevé de compte bancaire, aucun retrait en espèces. 
- J'ai d'autres sources de revenus ailleurs !
- Cela ne figure pas sur votre dernière déclaration d'impôts, ou alors c'est que vous avez des revenus illégaux non déclarés ?
 - Bon, vous me livrez ma pizza ou bien je vais ailleurs ?
- Certainement, monsieur, toujours à votre service, nos remarques sont uniquement destinées à vous être agréable. Pour quelle heure doit- on la livrer ?
- Mon épouse revient de chez sa mère au Mans et rentre vers 19 heures. Disons 20 heures serait idéal.
- Puis je me permettre une suggestion, avec votre accord bien sûr ?
- Je vous écoute.
- Votre épouse ne pourra sans doute pas être à 19 heures chez vous. Il est 18 heures et elle vient d'effectuer l'achat d'une Rolex dans une bijouterie de la Baule, il y a 6 minutes.
- Comment êtes-vous au courant ?
- Elle a effectué le paiement par carte sur son compte bancaire personnel numéroté en Suisse. Elle a d'ailleurs réglé sa note d'hôtel 
4 étoiles, en chambre double pour 3jours ainsi que des repas dans des restaurants étoilés pendant la même durée, toujours avec la même carte.
- Puis je connaître la somme débitée ?
- Non monsieur, nous respectons avant tout la vie privée des gens, nous n'avons pas le droit de dévoiler ce genre de renseignements.
- ÇA SUFFIT ! J'en ai ras le cul de Google, Facebook, Twitter, ... je me barre sur une ile déserte SANS internet, SANS téléphone et SURTOUT personne pour m'espionner !!!
 - Je comprends monsieur...mais vous devez donc refaire faire votre passeport dans ce cas car la date d'expiration est dépassée depuis 5 ans et 4 jours.

PiotrM
Avec Saint Maximilien Kolbe

Masculin Messages : 99
Localisation : Pologne
Inscription : 27/10/2019

Elizabeth Szeremeta, azais et Nicolas-p aiment ce message

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Smart Cities projet,  en anglais, mais alarmant  Empty Re: Smart Cities projet, en anglais, mais alarmant

Message par PiotrM Lun 30 Nov 2020 - 10:32

À l'époque où nous utilisons et utiliserons Internet, les smartphones, etc. de plus en plus, surtout Covid-19, qui a changé notre façon de travailler et la fonctionnement du business , des perspectives qui s'ouvrent pour le «Big Data» entreprises pourraient être dangereuses pour la plupart de l'humanité. 

( NB je suis polonais, je parle très couramment l'anglais, que j'utilise tous les jours, mais le français demande un petit effort, donc corrigez-moi si nécessaire. SVP)

--------------------------------------------------Voilà ! La premierière partie, ci-dessous . La deuxième  - plus tard ---------------------
L'exposé brûlant et alarmant de Jathan Sadowski révèle comment la technologie intelligente parviendra bientôt à dominer la vie humaine. Les organisations technocratiques utilisent des appareils intelligents pour extraire des données des corps, des maisons et des interactions avec la police et les agences gouvernementales. Tout ce que vous faites devient une source de valeur qu'ils agrègent, analysent et vendent aux compagnies d'assurance, aux détaillants et aux entreprises de surveillance. Les gouvernements et les entreprises utilisent des données pour vous contrôler en utilisant des méthodes de modification du comportement secrètes et manifestes.
· La «technologie intelligente» est une présence omniprésente et puissante dans la vie humaine.
· Les données sont une forme de capital; ceux qui ont le plus de données possèdent le plus de pouvoir.
· Le capitalisme numérique réduit les gens à des «flux de données».
· Les systèmes de crédit social (https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syst%C3%A8me_de_cr%C3%A9dit_social ) et la micro(?)gestion (?) des travailleurs via la technologie intelligente sont des outils de modification du comportement.
· La ville intelligente est une «machine de guerre urbaine» dans laquelle la surveillance de masse criminalise la vie quotidienne.
Sommaire
La «technologie intelligente» ("Smart tech” en l'anglais)  est une présence omniprésente et puissante dans la vie humaine.
La technologie intelligente est tout appareil ayant la capacité de «collecte de données, de connectivité réseau et de contrôle amélioré». Bientôt, la technologie intelligente ne sera plus facultative lorsque vous achetez, par exemple, une brosse à dents électrique; ce sera une fonctionnalité standard. Vous ne pourrez pas refuser à quelqu'un de suivre vos mouvements, votre comportement et vos préférences.
Pour chaque personne qui bénéficie de la technologie, d'autres souffrent. La technologie est naturellement politique, en ce sens que certaines personnes auront le pouvoir de prendre des décisions sur la façon dont les autres vivent et travaillent. Les technocrates qui détiennent le pouvoir font partie d'une oligarchie. Lorsque les citoyens ne participent pas aux décisions qui régissent leur vie, ils deviennent effectivement soumis à un État autoritaire de facto.
«L’impératif du contrôle consiste à créer des systèmes qui surveillent, gèrent et manipulent le monde et les gens.»
Dans cette ère à venir du «capitalisme numérique», la technopolitique se présentera de trois manières:
1. «Intérêts» - La technologie intelligente élargit et fait progresser les intérêts des entreprises, leur donnant la priorité sur «l'autonomie humaine, les biens sociaux et les droits démocratiques».
2. «Impératifs» - Le capitalisme numérique cherche à la fois à extraire des données et à exercer un contrôle sur tout et sur chaque personne.
3. «Impacts» - En échange de commodité et de connexion, les gens doivent subir des changements dans leur vie et leur vie privée qu'ils ne peuvent pas prévoir.
Il n'y a pas de complot pour nuire à la société ou à ses électeurs. Au lieu de cela, le système favorise les intérêts privilégiés.
Les données sont une forme de capital; ceux qui ont le plus de données possèdent le plus de pouvoir.
Amazon a transformé le commerce de détail, perturbant d'autres géants tels que Walmart et achetant récemment Whole Foods. Amazon Web Services est un véritable centre de contrôle dans le cloud et étendra la portée d'Amazon dans la vie quotidienne. Les entreprises et les gouvernements l'utilisent pour le calcul et pour stocker des données. Whole Foods, par exemple, suivra la façon dont les gens achètent des articles dans ses magasins, transformant les édifices physiques en «sites Web physiques». En échange d'une surveillance constante et de la perte de votre vie privée, Amazon rendra vos achats plus pratiques grâce à la facturation automatique. Il s’agit d’un exemple de «terraformation» ou de façonnage de la société par les technologies intelligentes pour servir les objectifs du capitalisme numérique.
«À l'instar d'autres projets politiques, bâtir une société intelligente est une bataille pour notre imagination.»
Les données sont une forme de capital - pas différente de l'argent ou des biens - avec de larges applications. Les données peuvent être utilisées pour:
· «Profil et cible des personnes» - Les entreprises gagnent des bénéfices en en sachant plus sur vous, par exemple, via des publicités personnalisées.
· «Optimiser les systèmes» - Pour réaliser des économies, les données sont utilisées pour accroître l'efficacité et réduire les déchets.
· «Gérer les choses» - Les connaissances issues de données, telles que les statistiques sur une application de santé pour surveiller le poids d'une personne ou la circulation dans les villes, sont utilisées pour améliorer les systèmes.
· «Probabilités de modèle» - Les données peuvent aider à faire des prédictions, par exemple, déterminer les «points chauds» criminels dans un quartier.
· «Construire des choses» - L'IA et l'apprentissage automatique aident à créer des plates-formes dépendant des données. Sans données, la société de taxi Uber n'existerait pas.
· «Augmenter la valeur des actifs» - Les données intelligentes peuvent ralentir le déclin des actifs tels que les machines ou les voitures.
Les technocrates veulent créer un monde de données et convertir n'importe qui, n'importe où - et n'importe quel processus - en profit. Mais les données ne sont pas simplement «là» pour être trouvées. «Data mining» est un terme trompeur, tout comme l'affirmation selon laquelle les données sont «le nouveau pétrole». Les deux impliquent à tort que des données existent pour être extraites. Ils ne reflètent pas le fait que les entités technocratiques fabriquent des données pour certains objectifs, et en ne compensant pas les gens pour ces données, elles les exploitent et les volent.

---- La deuxième  partie ---------------------
Le capitalisme numérique réduit les gens à des «flux de données». Le capitalisme numérique, via la technologie intelligente sur les applications, les téléphones ou sur le Wi-Fi, est un régime de contrôle qui définit les paramètres et surveille le comportement en permanence, en temps réel.
Plutôt que d'interagir avec une personne, le système interagit avec ses parties distinctes. Lorsque les capteurs collectent votre température ou comptent vos pas et envoient ces données pour agrégation, cela crée un profil basé sur vos comportements ou actions. Les courtiers en données vendent ces informations aux entreprises et aux gouvernements. Ces données ciblent mieux les consommateurs et aident les services de police, les employeurs et les agences gouvernementales à évaluer, par exemple, qui est susceptible de commettre un crime ou qui risque de manquer à un prêt.
Ces flux de données ont un impact important et croissant sur l'assurance. Aux États-Unis, l'assurance maladie est liée à l'emploi, et en promouvant le «bien-être», les employeurs surveillent de plus en plus la santé des employés avec des technologies portables, qui envoient des données pour analyse et ont un impact sur les avantages sociaux. Une autre technologie de santé à domicile extrait secrètement des données pour surveiller et punir les utilisateurs qui les utilisent de manière inappropriée.
«Enfin, les assureurs peuvent remplacer le vieux proverbe« faire confiance mais vérifier »par« se conformer ou autrement ».»
Les compagnies d'assurance automobile suivent les habitudes de conduite et ajustent vos primes en conséquence. En attribuant des primes aux activités quotidiennes des personnes, les assureurs procèdent à des modifications de comportement.
Les systèmes de crédit social et la microgestion des travailleurs via la technologie intelligente sont des outils de modification du comportement.
La Chine est un exemple de pays qui déploie des flux de données pour un contrôle total. Zhima Credit (Sesame Credit) s'est associé à Alibaba, la plus grande plate-forme de médias sociaux de Chine, pour transformer son énorme flux de données en un système de crédit social intégré. Le score à trois chiffres d'une personne reflète sa valeur, sa réputation et son statut. Zhima utilise des données collectées auprès de diverses sources professionnelles et personnelles. Les scores élevés apportent des avantages; les faibles scores relèguent les gens à la «sous-classe numérique». La Chine a l'intention de déployer son système intégré de crédit social en 2020, avec son message: «Si la confiance est rompue en un seul endroit, des restrictions sont imposées partout.»
«C'est la vérité étrangement conspiratrice de la société de surveillance dans laquelle nous vivons qu'il existe des entités inconnues rassemblant nos données à des fins inconnues.»
Parmi la main-d'œuvre peu rémunérée et non qualifiée aux États-Unis, le suivi invasif augmente. Amazon, par exemple, surveille chaque mouvement de ses employés dans ses centres de distribution. Des exemples dans d'autres entreprises incluent des logiciels permettant de suivre les frappes des travailleurs à distance et de placer des puces à l'intérieur des employés qui leur ouvrent les portes et utilisent des distributeurs automatiques. Le capitalisme a longtemps monétisé le travail au détriment du bien-être des travailleurs. Désormais, il exploite les gens de manière nouvelle et invasive.
Les gens laissent entrer la technologie intelligente dans leur vie et chez eux à cause d'une idéologie née dans la Silicon Valley: que chaque problème a une solution technologique. Ce «solutionnisme» technocratique néglige les valeurs humaines au profit des valeurs techniques.
La ville intelligente est une «machine de guerre urbaine» dans laquelle la surveillance de masse criminalise la vie quotidienne.
Certains pensent que la «ville intelligente» sera une «technoutopie», où les gens pourront vivre une vie sans frictions entourés de commodités à la pointe de la technologie alors que les agences de collecte de données suivent leurs mouvements et leurs habitudes pour améliorer les services. La technologie intelligente s'empare de l'imaginaire collectif et vend un avenir plein d'innovation. Mais avec la promesse d'une plus grande commodité vient l'imposition de paramètres et de limites au comportement.

Les solutions de ville intelligente incluent l'utilisation de la technologie pour prédire et punir la criminalité avec les plus vulnérables de la société comme sujets de test. Par exemple, Palantir, basée dans la Silicon Valley, fournit des outils de surveillance à la police. Les services qu'elle fournit aux villes manquent de transparence ou de responsabilité envers les citoyens qu'elle suit. D'autres technologies intelligentes suivent l'utilisation du téléphone portable et attribuent une intensité de menace à certains quartiers, prédisant où et quand le crime se produira.
Contrairement aux villes intelligentes des dépliants marketing, la vraie version est invisible et omniprésente, une «machine de guerre urbaine» qui surveille secrètement les actions des gens. La police collecte des données sur les personnes qui n’ont pas encore commis de crimes et les combine avec des données d’institutions privées et publiques pour créer des bases de données interrogeables appelées «centres de fusion», avec l’aide d’IBM et de Microsoft. Toutes les données sont désormais des données policières.
Les gens sacrifient les libertés civiles pour la sécurité. La police ciblera les quartiers à forte criminalité, conduisant à davantage d'arrestations et marginalisant davantage le quartier, car la prédiction devient une prophétie auto-réalisatrice. Cela empiéte sur la vie privée des citoyens, viole les droits civils et peut entraîner des poursuites injustifiées, des préjugés systémiques et d'autres violations des droits de l'homme. Le résultat est une grave érosion de la confiance.


Dernière édition par PiotrM le Sam 5 Déc 2020 - 12:28, édité 2 fois (Raison : La deuxième partie)

PiotrM
Avec Saint Maximilien Kolbe

Masculin Messages : 99
Localisation : Pologne
Inscription : 27/10/2019

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Smart Cities projet,  en anglais, mais alarmant  Empty Re: Smart Cities projet, en anglais, mais alarmant

Message par Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Revenir en haut


 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum